Golden State Warriors have a lack of shooting in frontcourt

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 04: Eric Paschall #7 of the Golden State Warriors is congratulated by Draymond Green #23 after their win over the Portland Trail Blazers at Chase Center on November 04, 2019 in San Francisco, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 04: Eric Paschall #7 of the Golden State Warriors is congratulated by Draymond Green #23 after their win over the Portland Trail Blazers at Chase Center on November 04, 2019 in San Francisco, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images) /
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The Golden State Warriors are accustomed to being elite shooters, but their frontcourt is severely lacking in 3-point threats.

The Golden State Warriors are largely responsible for the 3-point shooting boom that has taken place over the last decade. While other teams have experimented with this run-and-gun style of play in the past, the Dubs became the first team to truly unlock the full potential of this technique.

Obviously, Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson deserve an unbelievable amount of credit for this. The Splash Brothers have solidified themselves as the greatest 3-point shooting backcourt of all-time, but we have to acknowledge the importance of the Dubs’ frontcourt.

In many ways, Draymond Green was the missing piece to the puzzle. Many teams have elite 3-point shooters, but few squads have a jack-of-all-trades like Green. Not only does Draymond provide versatile defense but he is a sound distributor. Most of all, he used to be a fairly consistent shooter. Green was never a knockdown shooter but he was enough of a threat to earn respect. In the Warriors’ most successful season, 2015-16, Green shot nearly 40 percent from deep.

Frontcourt snipers like Kevin Durant, Omri Casspi and Jonas Jerebko all played pivotal roles with the team moving forward, offering a much-needed release valve for the Splash Brothers when defenses began to overload them.

Heading into next season, the Dubs won’t have this safety net. Green’s jump shot has completely failed him, shooting around 30 percent over the last five seasons. Meanwhile, rookie Eric Paschall has yet to show consistency from deep and Marquese Chriss has never been a reliable shooter.

The Warriors saving grace in the frontcourt could be Andrew Wiggins. The young forward has made strides as a shooter and impressed fans with offseason clips of him nailing 3-pointers. Still, Wiggins has only had one season in which he shot above 35 percent from the 3-point line.

This lack of shooting in the frontcourt could cause problems for the team. Especially if one of the Splash Bros falls with another injury. Expect the front office to address this issue in some way during the offseason.

Next. 3 Ways the Draft can save the Dubs. dark