Biggest Winners and Losers From Andre Iguodala Signing

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Golden State Warriors

January 3, 2013; Denver, CO, USA; Denver Nuggets guard Andre Iguodala (9) drives to the basket past Minnesota Timberwolves guard Alexey Shved (1) during the second half at the Pepsi Center. The Timberwolves won 101-97. Mandatory Credit: Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

I already wrote an article expounding Iguodala’s worth as a player, specifically as an improvement to the Warriors squad. When I wrote the article, I had to temper Iggy’s ability to contribute to the team with the fact that they would have to give up Klay Thompson or Harrison Barnes. Well, that obviously didn’t happen.

To quote one of my friends, “we traded a bag of peanuts for a star.” This is perhaps one of the best parts of the entire signing. Compound the fact that the Warriors signed one of the best two-way players in the league with the shedding of two of the worst contracts in the league in one fell swoop.

To create space for the Olympian, the Warriors had to trade away Brandon Rush, Andris Biedrins and Richard Jefferson, as well as a first-round pick in 2014 and 2017 and two second-round picks. In return, the Warriors got Kevin Murphy and nearly $24 million in cap space, and $12 million of that has to go to Iggy, but the move gives the Warriors greater flexibility to add depth to their oster.

Iguodala is a great addition to a team that desperately needs an athletic guard. The point-swingman has the skills and talent to play any position from the point guard to the power forward. He has the court vision and ball-handling skills to run the offense, the scoring and shooting ability to play shooting guard, and the rebounding skills and size to play small forward.

And let’s not forget defense. Iggy is a shutdown perimeter defender and would be a great mentor to Thompson going forward, as they have similar body types.

Conclusion: Winner

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