Draymond Green Has Uphill Climb Ahead


In a recent (and fantastic, by the way) piece, Adam Lauridsen of the San Jose Mercury News chronicles the last four seasons’ worth of Golden State Warriors rosters. His point is that the Warriors are better-positioned than they’ve ever been, on paper, to field a squad that’s deep and balanced enough to compete. It’s an awesome analysis of how the current Warriors roster stacks up against the ones from the last four years, complete with starter and role-player comparisons. It doesn’t bode well for fan favorite Draymond Green, though.

After five Summer League games, Green endeared himself to fans with his heady, gritty play. He’s also a nice underdog story, having been drafted in the second round despite being a First Team All-American. Everyone’s rooting for him.

But Lauridsen has Green pegged as the Warriors’ 12th man, one spot above Andris Biedrins on the depth chart. That’s a heavy dose of reality for Green, and a real testament to the Warriors’ apparent depth. But can Lauridsen be right? Is Green really a guy who might spend the bulk of his season on the bench and in the D-League?

Well, yeah.

It’s a bummer for Green and his new fans in Golden State, but it’s true. Unless he somehow leapfrogs a handful of better frontcourt options, Green won’t see much time. Harrison Barnes, Brandon Rush, Richard Jefferson, David Lee and Carl Landry are all likely to play ahead of Green this year. He’s really going to have to prove something in training camp to climb into the rotation.

From a glass-half-full perspective, this is a great problem for the Warriors to have. They’ve got a hungry rookie who might be capable of playing big minutes, but they have so many other good options that he’s buried on the depth chart.

Everyone’s hoping for the best for Green, but he’s got an uphill climb ahead of him.

 

 

Tags: Draymond Green Golden State Warriors

  • wil

    I’m not worried at all about Green, He’ll do just fine, He is way ahead of Biedrins and Tyler and should share the bulk with David Lee and Carl Landry, he doesn’t have to leapfrog nobody, there are minutes to go around with our depth.